Skeleton Pirate

Skeleton Pirate
Artist: LindaB

WELCOME TO STRONTIUM FOR BONES BLOG

Have you experienced, or read about, negative, and even dangerous, side effects from Fosamax (alendronate), Boniva (ibandronate), Actonel (risedronate), and other bisphosphonates prescribed for osteoporosis? If you have, then rest assured there is a safe, effective treatment for this condition. Strontium, primarily in the form of strontium citrate, is taken orally once a day.

Visitors to my blog can leave comments or ask questions and can remain anonymous, if they wish. Their comments are relayed to my g-mail inbox. Below each post, the number of comments for that post is cited and underlined because it is a link. By clicking on that link below any post, a window opens so that a visitor can leave a comment. Ideally, visitors leave comments on posts most relevant to their comments. All comments to my posts are moderated by me.

Browse the posts and visit the link library of references.

Visit me at www.twitter.com






Blog Archive

Thursday, December 18, 2008

Bone Quality

Bone strength is determined by several properties, especially bone mass, which is measured using ionizing radiation (DEXA scan). Another technique used to evaluate bone strength uses ultrasound waves to describe two other properties of bone that are also related to bone strength: elasticity and structure. As the ultrasound wave passes through the heel bone (os calcis), the wave is altered. The way in which the ultrasound wave is altered describes the elasticity and structure of the bone. These two properties are combined into the term “Stiffness Index”. Studies have shown that Stiffness Index is related to bone density, making it a good indicator of bone strength.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hi bonelady,

I'm planning to start taking Strontium but have questions. I took Actonel for 4 years and got worse instead of better. I went off of it for almost 2 years and during that time my BMD stayed the same. (hip -2.5, spine -3.3). My recent NTX, however, was 59 (up from 39 last year) so my Dr. wants me to go back on treatment. I've taken just 2 weekly doses of Actonel so far, but now I'm stopping (first missing dose is today). Do I need to wait any length of time before starting the Strontium? Thanks, Cheryl

BoneLady said...

Hi Cheryl,

You do not have to wait to start taking strontium after having taken weekly doses of Actonel if you are not experiencing negative side effects. I waited four weeks between my last weekly dose of Fosamax and my first daily dose of strontium because I had been feeling ill for the last three months on Fosamax. Luckily, I felt better almost immediately after discontinuing Fosamax.

Anonymous said...

Hi, Thanks for your answer. No lingering side effects from the Actonel (aside from the bad feeling that I've been poisoning myself for no gain). I'll start the Strontium as soon as it arrives in the mail. Still have to decide how I will fit it into my day. I take Citracal with every meal. Seems like the best idea is to take the Strontium in the middle of the night and go back to bed !
Cheryl

BoneLady said...

Hi Cheryl,

I take calcium at every meal from either food or supplements. In order to separate my intake of calcium and strontium by at least two hours, I take strontium near bedtime. Some people take strontium first thing in the morning and then wait at least one hour before breakfast. I'm sure you'll establish a suitable schedule for yourself. Good luck with your strontium therapy!

Anonymous said...

Hi Bonelady,

I have been doing research for my mother who is in her 80s and needs something to help with her osteoporosis. She is suffering from fractures and pain. She has - unfornately - tried Fosomax and Boniva several years ago. No surprise, it didn't help her bone density. And it was also difficult to take - so sad so many doctors recommend it like candy. I think I see on your blog that youu started on the strontium about a year ago. I was looking to see if you had any positive results but I don't see anything posted about any recent test results for you. Do you have any current results? Anything positive to say about strontium results before I recommend to my mother? Thanks so much.

BoneLady said...

Response to Anonymous' post of 02/03/09:

I hope you do not wait to see my test results before recommending strontium to your mother because there is much better evidence of its efficacy than one person's results. My next DEXA, due May of this year, will be two years from the last one, the recommended interval.

Servier, the French company that makes strontium ranelate, has evidence from clinical trials showing that strontium reduced fractures in women age 80 and over by a third.

Strontium citrate at the recommended dose of 2194 mg provides 680 mg elemental strontium, the same effective dose as strontium ranelate.

BoneLady said...

Second Response to post of 02/02/09:

Before recommending any course of treatment to your mom, make sure she has adequate blood levels of vitamin D. The test for this is called a 25-hydroxyvitamin D test, often abbreviated as 25(OH)D. Many people who have had stress fractures are vitamin D deficient. If she is deficient, her doctor can prescribe large doses of vitamin D until her levels are normalized. Then, she can take maintenance dosages. I cannot stress this test enough for someone already suffering from fractures.

Wandering Skeleton

Wandering Skeleton
Artist: Joel Hoekstra

Osteoporotic Bone

Osteoporotic Bone
Source: www.mayoclinic.com

How Strontium Builds Bones

Strontium is a mineral that tends to accumulate in bone. Studies have shown that oral doses of strontium are a safe and effective way to prevent and reverse osteoporosis. Doses of 680 mg per day appear to be optimal. See my "For More Information About Strontium" links section.

Osteoporosis is caused by changes in bone production. In healthy young bones there is a constant cycle of new bone growth and bone removal. With age, more bone is removed and less new bone is produced. The bones become less dense and thus more fragile.

Scientists believe that strontium works in two ways. It may stimulate the replication of pre-osteoblasts, leading to an increase in osteoblasts (cells that build bone). Strontium also directly inhibits the activity of osteoclasts (cells that break down bone). The result is stronger bones.

When taking strontium, be sure to take 1200 mg calcium, 1000 IU vitamin D3, and 500 mg magnesium daily. It is best to take strontium late at night on an empty stomach. Calcium and strontium may compete with each other for absorption if taken together.